Mesh Drawings

This is a new area for exploration that builds on some experiments I did for printmaking monoprints and collagraph.

I started to use netting from oranges, garlic and other fruit while doing Assignment 1 Octavia. These are of different types – thin string, plastic and different thicknesses that can be cut, stretched, twisted and combined into images.

My intention was to then go over these experiments in white or black acrylic paint as with the glue drawings. But then I see also ways of using photographs digitally.

So a technique where there are quite a lot of possibilities for integrating into my images in different ways.

Charcoal Drawing

I really like the dark moody tone of charcoal. In the past I have used a range of techniques. Using willow/vine, compressed and condensed charcoal on different types of paper. I do have to be careful though using charcoal as I have a lot of problems with the dust.

One way of overcoming this is to use pencil and then charcoal pencil.

Inspiration for improving technique

Pencil and charcoal pencil for hyperrealism

 

Pencil Drawing

I really enjoy using pencil in different ways.

Line and sketching

I also collect all the sharpenings from graphite sticks in a small container to use as graphite powder for shading – taking care not to inhale this.

Some earlier drawings using this technique

Drawings for Hybrids.

Inspiration for pencil technique

I want to significantly improve my pencil drawing, both dynamism of line and also hyperrealism.

JD Hilberry

Glue Drawings

I had often earlier used PVA glue with ink because I like the random ways in which it mixes to create interesting textures for landscapes and abstracts. Some drawings from my earlier OCA courses are given below.

While doing the Invisible Cities Assignment I discovered glue drawings as I was looking for something ‘sticky’ for Octavia spider webs. I suddenly noticed some of the drips from the PVA glue bottle as I was making collage and thought this might be very interesting to make spiders webs with drops of rain, and very thin lines. So I made three random images in my sketchbook that roughly had some sort of spider’s web, but basically just playing.

The first of these I rubbed over with graphite powder (I collect sharpenings from graphite sticks in a small container). I really liked the smoky effect. I then used a water brush and started to polish up some of the areas and found I could get really interesting gradations.

The second I covered with charcoal and rubbed off the excess from the raised parts.

The third sketch I painted over with black acrylic and a credit card. Then drew into this with white conte and pastel to accentuate raised areas and get some tone shading.

Finally I photographed cropped areas and experimented with different effects in Photoshop – mainly curves and invert. I could take this much further using masks, but have not had the time.

I really like the effects I obtained just by doodling. But this technique – together with earlier PVA and painting techniques – have a lot more potential for further development now I have some idea how things work. There is also a lot more I could do incorporating digital blending and masking into the workflow – some of which I did in Assessment 1 Octavia. But a lot to be further explored – I could colour parts and be more extreme in my blend mode choices.

Shaun Tan

Inspiration for:

Image and text

Sources

Shaun Tan website

Wikipedia

Shaun Tan is a graphic illustrator of very poignant short allegorical graphic novels whose work I very much admire. The strength is in the combination of very strong visual dynamics and simplification, coupled with a high level of artistic skill. His recent work uses maquettes and puppets.

Key works

Shaun Tan is an Australian artist, writer and film maker. He won an Academy Award for The Lost Thing, a 2011 animated film adaptation of a 2000 picture book he wrote and illustrated. Beside The Lost Thing, The Red Tree and The Arrival are books he has written and illustrated. These have different but distinctive approaches to layout and combining image and text. Some of these have been animated – either straight animation of the illustrations with types text, or CGI.

His artistic process

Initially, Tan works in black and white because the final reproductions would be printed that way. Some black and white mediums he uses include pens, inks, acrylics, charcoal, scraperboard, photocopies, and linocuts.

Tan’s current colour works still begin in black and white. He uses a graphite pencil to make sketches on ordinary copy paper. The sketches are then reproduced numerous times with different versions varying with parts added or removed. Sometimes scissors are used for this purpose. The cut and paste collage idea in these early stages is often extend to the finished production with many of his illustrations using such materials as “glass, metal, cuttings from other books and dead insects”.

Tan describes himself as a slow worker who revises his work many times along the way. He is interested in loss and alienation, and believes that children in particular react well to issues of natural justice.

 

 

 

Tom Burns

Source: website http://www.tomburns.co.uk (but this does not have the work I like).

Between Clarke and Hilldale

Tom Burns is a London based Illustrator. His work combines digital techniques with collage and the use of more traditional screen-printing processes. He has worked for a range of international clients in advertising, publishing, editorial and design. His clients include The Folio Society, BBC, British Heart Foundation, The Globe & Mail, Harvard Business Review, Readers Digest, The Boston Globe, Q Magazine, BBDO, Financial Times, The Guardian, John Brown publishing, Kingston University, Advocate Magazine, Advocate, Virago Press, Billboard Magazine, Serino/Coyne, National Magazine, CNN Money Magazine, American Airlines.

The images below are from my Illustration 1 logbook and no longer available on-line. They are part of my visual inspiration for Assignment 2: Cambridge and Assignment 4: Aldeburgh


Martin O’Neill

Sources:

Cut it Out

Martin O’Neill is a British illustrator and collage artist. His enigmatic textured images combine collage, silkscreen, photography, paint, and digital techniques. He works from a vast archive of found and self generated material and also works with stock and supplied imagery.

My favourite images – for their mysterious ambiguity: