Sue Coe

Sources:

Wikipedia

The Nation

Artnet

Sue Coe Facebook page

Graphic Witness

Americans who tell the truth

Sue Coe (born 1951) is an English artist and illustrator, currently working  from upstate New York.  Her work is highly political, and part of her activism. Having grown up next to a slaughterhouse, she has been particularly involved  in trying to stop the animal cruelty that takes places hidden behind its walls.  Her work is often directed against capitalism, focusing on issues like sweatshops, prisons, AIDS and war.

She uses a realistic drawing style, sketching what she sees in slaughterhouses, prisons and sweatshops – having developed strategies for getting permission to draw and talk to people there. These sketches are then used as developed drawings in charcoal and other media, painting and printmaking, often published as illustrated books and comics. Her illustrations have appeared in a wide variety of publications, including The New York TimesThe New Yorker, and The Nation.

She is an artist I want to study more for insights into political illustration, particularly ways of portraying very upsetting situations and linking striking imagery with activism.

Selected bibliography from Wikipedia

Olivia Lomenech Gill

website: http://www.oliviagill.com

My daughter bought me ‘Where My Wellies Take Me’ I really like the wistful dreamy style of this. Also her detailed Drypoint  and collage in other works.

Want to do a proper analysis of this one and try out some of her techniques in my work on Aldeburgh – that place is particularly suited to her type style.

 

Urban sketching: people

For basic figure drawing see: Figure Sketching

Stylisation

I realily like the very basic stylised figures here. An architectural illustrator.

This is a very basic stylised video, showing use of eyeline and basic principles of capturing people in a scene. I like the variation between ink outline, then others started in wash.

Teoh’s tips for sketching people on location – contour drawing and don’t keep moving your head up and down.


This one is just inking in already drawn people. But I like the style.

Realitime videos by Meridel L. Abrams following of how she copes with the various challenges of sketching on location.The first is very rapid sketching of shoppers in a parking lot. The second more stationary outside a restaurant. Both done from a car.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OoilZxRELYo

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1QIN5-5r4X4

History of Reportage Illustration

Ancient stone friezes

Telling tales of war and conquests

Tapestries

Bayeux Tapestry

Medieval Miniatures

17th Century

In 17th century woodcuts were used to illustrate cheap publications called broadsides and later chapbooks or rags (named after the recycled fabric they were made from). These focused on murders, robberies and executions and provided grizzly depictions of victims and consequences.

Goya Disasters of War

Nineteenth Century

By the nineteenth century news reporting had widened its scope and, with it, the breadth of material illustrated. As the market for newspapers increased the quality of the illustrations improved with the use of more expensive wood engravings and etchings. It took a while for photography to become integrated into newspaper publishing as a form of journalism, mainly because of the technical issues of printing photographs.

In Fine Art painters at the end of the nineteenth century painted social topics:

Degas Absinthe Drinkers

Sickert Camden Town Murders

Cezanne Card Players

Contemporary

Reportage illustration remained a mainstay of newspaper publishing well into the twentieth century.

Documentary Photography

Shirley Baker

Artists

L S Lowry

German Expressionists: Otto Dix etc

Contemporary Reportage illustration

Still exists as a way of providing a viewpoint on hard to document events, from courtrooms where cameras are banned, to personal experiences such as travel that are difficult to sum up in one image. And to convey mood of a piece.

Graham Dean

Franziska Neubert

Jake and Dinos Chapman: reinterpretation and reworking of Goya and other contentious issues.

Frank McMahon

Sally Pring

Urban Sketching: pen and ink

Styles


Alphonso Dunn

A very good series on the process of constructing a scene.
First think about the type of line – drawing with arm, wrist or fingers. Framing and focus. Can see things in different ways. Importance of simplification.

L S Lowry

source Wikipedia and Google images

Laurence Stephen Lowry (1 November 1887 – 23 February 1976) is famous for painting scenes of life in the industrial districts of North West England in the mid-20th century. Many of his drawings and paintings depict Pendlebury, Lancashire, where he lived and worked for more than 40 years, and also Salford and its surrounding areas.

He developed a distinctive style of painting urban landscapes peopled with human figures often referred to as “matchstick men”. He painted mysterious unpopulated landscapes, brooding portraits and the unpublished “marionette” works, which were only found after his death.

Going to Work

The Derelict House