Maggi Hambling

Maggi Hambling website

Edge paintings

The Wave Fitzwilliam Museum exhibition 2010

Walls of Water: The Monotypes, Marlborough Gallery 2014-2015

Google images

Hambling, M. 2009. You Are the Sea, Great Britain, Lux Books.
Hambling, M. 2010. The Aldeburgh Scallop, Suffolk, Full Circle Editions.
Hambling, M. 2010. The Sea, Salford Quays, Lowry Press.

Maggi Hambling is a British painter, sculptor and printmaker. Born in Suffolk, she has a particular link with Aldeburgh through her Waves paintings and prints – evocative of the ways the North Sea has ravaged the coast. Her recent work has had a much more political stance, for example in War and Requiem, and also in Edge the exhibition that was showing in Aldeburgh Peter Peers Gallery at the beginning of my visit for Project 4.2 ‘Aldeburgh Diary’.

Wave paintings

The North Sea, often like a raging beast, is eating away and changing the shoreline forever. As I get older, I identify with the shifting shingle, as time, like the sea, enforces an inevitable erosion. But this raging beast is as demanding as a lover and I am still seduced and challenged. (2010 The Sea p18)

“As the waves of the North Sea voraciously consume our coast, these new paintings respond to the energy of their action as they break. This sea, the widest of mouths, roaring or laughing, is always seductive. Life and death mysteriously co-exist in the timeless rhythm of the waves.” Maggi Hambling, 2010 Wave website Fitzwilliam Museum

I am the shifting shingle, you approach with stealth, then the dark rooms of your curves, I am tossed, lost, displaced, with greedy lovers’ tongues and lips, you suck in and in again. we rise together, we rise together, then float safe on liquid breasts until the dance begins again and you thrust deep and my resistance is low, dissolve, dissolve. no defence against your relentless advance. I am but a ghost of the shore, disappeared in you. (2009 You Are the Sea text)

Edge

This exhibition is more political than much of her earlier work on the sea, dealing with the refugee crisis, battle for Aleppo and global warming.

It is called Edge because I feel we are ‘on the edge’. There is a fragility to our existence – both ours and the planet and these works attempt to address that and strike up a dialogue with whoever is looking at them.

The Edge paintings are large, with characteristic dramatic swirls of texture, that then on further looking show fine detail – people, remains of buildings and boats caught up in the chaos. The global warming paintings have a lot of gold, echoing renaissance paintings – but gold is now a reference to greed.

See: article by Andrew Clarke: Maggi Hambling creates new show about life on the edge

The Scallop

Hambling also designed the controversial Scallop sculpture on the beach at Aldeburgh that references the life and work of Benjamin Britten whose opera Peter Grimes was based on Aldeburgh. Part of the controversy comes from continuing homophobia of protesters.

The words read:

I hear those voices that will not be drowned

This first video below begins with very atmospheric photography of the Scallop and sea and sky in Aldeburgh to Benjamin Britten’s Four Sea Interludes from Peter Grimes opera – then unfortunately it descends into farce.

This second video has film of Maggi Hambling sketching to the Storm section from Peter Grimes opera.

Tessa Newcomb

http://www.thompsonsgallery.co.uk/artist.php/Tessa-Newcomb-330/

Paris

distinctive quirky illustrations: oil paint, watercolour, lithographs. Pencil on oil. Or pencil and watercolour.

I paint Paris how I want it to look. A Paris drawn from films, books, poems. Fewer cars, less noise and stress, better clothes, nicer notice boards – or that’s what I like to imagine. I use selective vision.

flat and skewed perspective. A lot of neutral pastel colours.

somewhat randomly inserted. Different sizes. Captions give title, medium and size – as if they are to be sold???

somewhat random text. In chapters, but without clear narrative. Little vignettes with illustration.

how I see paris

gold

glass

markets

spaces

dogs

doorknobs

Interview with Tessa Newcomb

http://www.bridgemanimages.com/en-GB/all-the-news/interview-with-tessa-newcomb

 

Sue Coe

Sources:

Wikipedia

The Nation

Artnet

Sue Coe Facebook page

Graphic Witness

Americans who tell the truth

Sue Coe (born 1951) is an English artist and illustrator, currently working  from upstate New York.  Her work is highly political, and part of her activism. Having grown up next to a slaughterhouse, she has been particularly involved  in trying to stop the animal cruelty that takes places hidden behind its walls.  Her work is often directed against capitalism, focusing on issues like sweatshops, prisons, AIDS and war.

She uses a realistic drawing style, sketching what she sees in slaughterhouses, prisons and sweatshops – having developed strategies for getting permission to draw and talk to people there. These sketches are then used as developed drawings in charcoal and other media, painting and printmaking, often published as illustrated books and comics. Her illustrations have appeared in a wide variety of publications, including The New York TimesThe New Yorker, and The Nation.

She is an artist I want to study more for insights into political illustration, particularly ways of portraying very upsetting situations and linking striking imagery with activism.

Selected bibliography from Wikipedia

Helen Goldberg

 

https://www.artrage.com/artist-feature-helene-goldberg/ 

‘I often start out using the roller brush and try to create interesting textures, colors as ground for my painting. Sometimes I will set down a gold or other background roughly in ArtRage and then take it to iColorama to change its texture and reimport it to ArtRage. That allows me to create images that remind me of medieval or Japanese paintings on gold leaf. Sometimes I experiment with using the water color brush on an oil painting. It creates a whole new medium that’s not possible in the same way with physical paints.

Often when I paint, I’ll start with a mental impression of an artist I like. I don’t try to copy them, but I will incorporate some aspect that intrigues me. I’ll look at the calligraphic lines in Kline, use of gold leaf in Klimt, or depiction of sunlight in Turner and work it into my painting.

 

Ilya Tyljakov

Russian concept artist who does a lot of his work in Procreate.

example of procreate narrative painting

 

Digital landscapes

 

His Brushes

interesting how he uses his fingers. To get variation here need to set velocity settings.

Digital watercolour

!!To do a thorough review in autumn when Aps have been upgraded for iOS 11. Digital watercolour is a key feature for upgrade with faster processing speeds.

Currently my attempts are pretty crude. These will be explored for Assignment 4 on Aldeburgh.

Currently digital watercolour depends on transparency effects, edge effects, and deletion with water brushes to vary transparency.

Procreate

Good at very detailed drawings that build up gradually in textured layers using a combination of water brush shapes (including drips) and water eraser. Use alpha lock for edge effects. Has the most control over brush shape. Bleeds have to be simulated through smudge or eraser tool and edge effects. Due for significant upgrade in the autumn.

For the most beautiful effects I have found:

Basic effects:

ArtRage
Can get interesting effects with the canvas variants. Mainly focuses on edge effects.

Adobe Sketch
Watercolour brush is the only brush I would really use from the built-in toolset. It has really nice bleed effects that are fascinating to watch. Good for atmospheric abstract effects. But difficult to get real subtlety. Upgrade due?

Auryn Ink
Dedicated watercolour for more complex combined techniques. Has 3 layers that dry at different rates that can be controlled. But quite slow at higher resolution.

Tayasui Sketch
Can get nice Japanese watercolour effects with vector gradients for beautiful anime type effects. But not watercolour as such.

Illustration as object

To be further developed, including more on ceramics and textiles. Also wrapping paper, T-shirts etc.

Illustration as object explores the overlap between illustration and design disciplines such as interior and textile design through the use of illustration on fabrics, materials or wallpapers, or illustration and fashion feeding into t-shirt and pattern design.

Illustrations as an object can be considered from two directions:

  • existing objects which become a surface for illustration or
  • objects which are used as a way of making illustrations.

Illustrators have traditionally either applied their illustrations to new surfaces (cups and saucers, fabrics, t-shirts, the sides of buses, etc.) or used 3D forms as a way of making their work, through paper craft or modelling.

Contemporary illustrators still work from both of those directions, adding in
newer contemporary surfaces and exploring new materials, but they have also branched out into new areas of making, especially in the form of soft toys and character designs.

Tord Boontje produces lighting and tableware by features laser-cut fronds and blooms alongside transfer-printed creatures and landscapes.

Jaime Hayon  Spanish designer covers plates, vases, walls, shop and restaurant interiors with bold, expressionist strokes and calligraphic messages.