MediBang Paint

MediBang Paint is a FREE lightweight digital painting and comic creation program that comes loaded with brushes, fonts, pre-made backgrounds, and other resources. MediBang Paint is available on Windows, Mac OS X, Android and iOS. The app uses cloud saving allowing users to easily transfer their work between platforms.

The Android version allows illustrators to draw anywhere they want, while retaining all of the features of the desktop versions of the software.

MediBang Paint includes many different creative tools for illustrators and comic book artists. Some of these include, numerous brushes, screentones and backgrounds, cloud fonts and comic creation tools. Finally registering on MediBang’s site for free gives users access to cloud storage so they can easily manage, backup and share their work.

☆ Paint or make comics anywhere on your smartphone!
・This app comes with almost as many features as a desktop painting program.
・Its interface is made specifically for smartphones so users can easily paint, change brush sizes, or colors with no problems.
・Color can be intuitively changed in HSV mode.

☆Painting Tools
・Use over 100 free brushes* to draw a variety of colorful spectacles.
*A great selection available from Airbrush, Pencil, Watercolor, G Pen, Mapping Pen, Sumi, Flat Brush, Round Brush, Acrylic, School Pen, Turnip Pen, Drawing Pen, and Soft Pastel to Multi Brushes like the Salad Brush.
・Force Fade in and Out makes your lines sharp even if you’re drawing with your fingers.

☆ Access tons of Resources for free
・Users get access to 850 tones, textures, backgrounds and word balloons for free.
・There are premade backgrounds that include city scenes and vehicles to cut down on user’s workloads.
・Tones, textures and backgrounds can be dragged and dropped into a picture. They can also be rotated, scaled or transformed freely.

☆ Free comic book fonts to give your comics a professional look.
・Depending on what fonts you use, the atmosphere of your comic can change enormously.
・Having the right fonts for the right scenes and characters is very important.

☆Create comic panels easily
・Just dragging across the canvas can divide a panel into more panels.
・You can transform or add color to panels after you create them.

☆Stress free drawing
・MediBang Paint’s interface is extremely simple and user friendly.
・New users can easily pick up the programs, and begin making comics or illustrating.
・Users can customize shortcuts making production even easier.

☆Draw efficiently
・Snap guides make drawing in perspective easy.
・Pen correction helps make the lines you draw smooth.

☆Easily edit your work.
・With layers you can draw different things on different layers.
・Draw a character’s hair hairstyle on one layer and you can change it without having to redraw the entire head.

☆Using a photo to draw a picture.
・You can take photos and place them in their own layer. Then create a new layer on top of it to trace over them. This is particularly useful for drawing backgrounds.

☆Adding dialog with speech to text
・You can add dialog to your comics with your voice to text feature.
・Of course you can still use the keyboard if you want for longer dialogs.

☆Work with others no matter where you are
・Files you’ve uploaded can be shared with others allowing you to work together.
・You can use this feature to work on a project with several people.

☆With just one single click, you can share you work.
・With one click you can upload your work to the MediBang art community.
・Work you’ve uploaded can also be shared on your social network accounts.

☆Easy to use
・Even if you do get stuck there’s a help feature in the app.

[External links]
For more info, click here.

メディバンTOP


Updates and news are also posted on Twitter and Facebook.

https://www.facebook.com/pages/MediBang-Paint/450942718399062

Yoshimoto Nara

Yoshimoto Nara Google Images

Yoshimoto Nara Slash with A Knife – a book I bought in Tokyo

edited from Wikipedia

Yoshitomo Nara (奈良 美智 Nara Yoshitomo?, born 5 December 1959 lives and works in Tokyo. Nara grew up in a time when Japan was experiencing an inundation of Western pop culture; comic books, Walt Disney animation and Western rock music. He first came to the attention of the art world in the 1990s during Japan’s Pop art movement. Since then he has achieved a worldwide cult status. In June, 2005, Nara’s artwork was featured in the album titled “Suspended Animation” by experimental band Fantômas. Other commercial products (including videos, books, magazines, catalogues and monographs) have been dedicated to Nara’s work. Recently, a two-volume catalogue raisonné of all his sculptures, paintings, and drawings was completed.

The fiercely independent subjects that populate so much of his artwork may be a reaction to Nara’s own largely independent childhood. The subject matter of his sculptures and paintings is deceptively simple: most works depict one seemingly innocuous subject (often pastel-hued children and animals drawn with confident, cartoonish lines) with little or no background. But these children, who appear at first to be cute and even vulnerable, sometimes brandish weapons like knives and saws. Their wide eyes often hold accusatory looks that could be sleepy-eyed irritation at being awoken from a nap—or that could be undiluted expressions of hate.

Nara, however, does not see his weapon-wielding subjects as aggressors. “Look at them, they [the weapons] are so small, like toys. Do you think they could fight with those?” he says. “I don’t think so. Rather, I kind of see the children among other, bigger, bad people all around them, who are holding bigger knives…”

The manga and anime of his 1960s childhood are both clear influences on Nara’s stylized, large-eyed figures. Nara subverts these typically cute images, however, by infusing his works with horror-like imagery. This juxtaposition of human evil with the innocent child may be a reaction to Japan’s rigid social conventions. He has been influenced by punk rock music – a similar – if more unsettling – image of rebellious, violent youth, Nara’s art embraces the punk ethos. Nara has  cited other traditions as varied  Renaissance painting, literature, illustration, ukiyo-e and graffiti as further inspiration.

Yoshimoto Nara

William Hogarth

Research Point Project 3.1

The 1751 satirical engravings of Beer Street and Gin Lane were part of a campaign to curb gin drinking among the poor in London.

William Hogarth : Beer Street and Gin Lane 1751
William Hogarth : Beer Street and Gin Lane 1751
Research Point Questions

How has Hogarth has used denotation and connotation? What has he shown literally through denotation to support his anti-gin/pro-beer argument and what is implied through connotation? Think about the visual language and symbolic structure he has used to construct meaning – for example, the use of buildings in good repair or disuse, what’s in the foreground and what’s in the distance. What about the pawnbroker’s symbol and the symbolism in the physical language of the human body – the gestures, poses, sizes? There’s even a dead body in there somewhere. How does Hogarth use these to construct meaning?

In the anti-gin image the eye is drawn particularly to the drunkennes of the woman in the centre and her falling baby – one assumes this is more shocking than the wasted thin man in the bottom right (who probably also has a neglected baby at home). The line of the woman’s body leads the eye to the brawling and coffin in the background. In the middle ground are three figures one of whom is eating bones – this is emphasised through contrasting the white figure against his black hat. The pawnbroker’s shop seems to be doing a brisk trade.

In contrast most of the figures in the beer image are jolly portly men. The woman has a fish trade and is only stopping off temporarily – it seems she is even reading – with her husband? The pawnbroker’s sign is broken and the door shut. The background is festive and orderly.

Further research on Hogarth