Sara Fanelli

Sara Fanelli website: http://www.sarafanelli.com

Sara Fanelli Pinocchio

edited from Wikipedia

Sara Fanelli (born 1969) is a native-Italian British artist and illustrator, best known for her children’s picture books. Fanelli was born in Florence. She came to London to study art at Camberwell College of Art and then the Royal College of Art where she graduated in 1995.

Books
  • Button (London: ABC, 1994)
  • My Map Book (ABC, 1995)
  • Pinocchio Picture Box; Cinderella Picture Box (ABC, 1996)[7]
  • Wolf! (Heinemann, 1997)
  • A Dog’s Life (Heinemann, 1998); US edition, The Doggy Book (Running Press, 1998)
  • It’s Dreamtime (Heinemann, 1999)
  • Dear Diary (Walker Books, 2000)
  • First Flight (Jonathan Cape, 2002)
  • Mythological Monsters of Ancient Greece (Walker, 2002)
  • Pinocchio (Walker, 2003) – an edition of Carlo Collodi, The Adventures of Pinocchio (orig. 1883, Italian), OCLC 51848324[1][a]
  • Sometimes I think, Sometimes I am (Tate Publishing, 2007)
  • The Onion’s Great Escape (Phaidon Press, 2012) – a movable book[clarification needed]
Children’s poetry collections and anthologies
  • Dibby Dubby Dhu and other poems, by George Barker (Faber and Faber, 1997)
  • All Sorts: poems, by Christopher Reid (London: Ondt & Gracehoper, 1999)
  • Alphabetical Order, poetry by Reid (Ondt & Gracehoper, 2001)[9]
  • The New Faber Book of Children’s Verse, ed. Matthew Sweeney (Faber, 2001); reissued 2003 as The New Faber Book of Children’s Verse
  • Sensational!: poems inspired by the five senses, selected by Roger McGough (Macmillan Children’s, 2004) OCLC 60416676

Saul Bass

I want to make beautiful things, even if nobody cares, as opposed to ugly things. That’s my intent.

‘’try to reach for a simple, visual phrase that tells you what the picture is all about and evokes the essence of the story”

“making the ordinary extraordinary”

“The nature of process, to one degree or another, involves failure. You have at it. It doesn’t work. You keep pushing. It gets better. But it’s not good. It gets worse. You got at it again. Then you desperately stab at it, believing “this isn’t going to work.” And it does!” by Saul Bass

Source: Wikipedia article

Book: Saul Bass (to be done)

Saul Bass (1920 – 1996) was an American graphic designer and Academy Award winning filmmaker, best known for his design of motion picture title sequences, film posters, and corporate logos. Much of Saul Bass’s work was made in close collaboration with his wife Elaine.

During his 40-year career Bass worked for some of Hollywood’s most prominent filmmakers, including Alfred Hitchcock, Otto Preminger, Billy Wilder, Stanley Kubrick and Martin Scorsese. For Alfred Hitchcock, Bass provided effective, memorable title sequences, inventing a new type of kinetic typography, for North by Northwest (1959), Vertigo (1958), working with John Whitney, and Psycho (1960). Among his most famous title sequences are the animated paper cut-out of a heroin addict’s arm for Preminger’s The Man with the Golden Arm, the credits racing up and down what eventually becomes a high-angle shot of a skyscraper in Hitchcock’s North by Northwest, and the disjointed text that races together and apart in Psycho.

Bass aimed to get the audience to see familiar parts of their world in an unfamiliar way. Examples of this or what he described as “making the ordinary extraordinary” can be seen in Walk on the Wild Side (1962) where an ordinary cat becomes a mysterious prowling predator, and in Nine Hours to Rama (1963) where the interior workings of a clock become an expansive new landscape.

Poster images

Anatomy of a Murder

Film title sequences

Published on 3 Apr 2014

Some of the most remarkable opening titles designed by Saul Bass, sometimes in collaboration with his wife Elaine Bass. From “The Man with the Golden Arm” (1955) to “Casino” (1995), this video represents a substantial part of his creative legacy in chronological order.

Bass also designed some of the most iconic corporate logos in North America, including the Bell System logo in 1969, as well as AT&T’s globe logo in 1983 after the breakup of the Bell System. He also designed Continental Airlines’ 1968 jet stream logo and United Airlines’ 1974 tulip logo, which became some of the most recognized airline industry logos of the era.

Why Man [sic] Creates

 

explores the process, results, and social and philosophical implications of creativity. But as if women never existed or created anything!

 

Yuji Hiratsuka

Yuji Hiratsuka sees Japan as a land of contrasts. On the surface it looks rather westernized with McDonald and Coca Cola. But underneath the facade traditional Japanese culture and values remained unchanged. His graphic work is a witty and original synthesis of old Japanese ukiyo-e tradition and modern Western elements.

website: http://www.artelino.com/articles/yuji_hiratsuka.asp

Google images

Japanese gardens are cultivated high atop thirty story Western skyscrapers, or people dine on McDonald’s hamburgers while watching Sumo wrestling. In my work I explore this chaotic coexistence.

“There are many and varied points of view in modern Japan. Some survive from historic periods of significant aesthetic and philosophical development. Two periods in particular contribute to what is known as traditional Japanese art.”

“During the first, in the middle of the 16th century, the Shogun lords closed Japan to all foreign interactions and evolved an art independent of Chinese models. The most important influence was the simplicity born in the spirit of the Zen sect. Art based on Zen was an art of suggestion rather than expression; it emphasized the importance of empty spaces and simple forms.”

“The second period is the Edo era of the 17th century in which the Ukiyo-e school developed a popular art form, largely prints and reproductions, inexpensively designed for common people. Ukiyo-e art was decorative and brightly colored and often featured poster-like caricatures of national personalities (Yakusha-e).”

“In my work I draw from the ancient and the contemporary to express the mismatched combinations and hodgepodge which is Japanese daily life. The Zen aspect can be seen in my portraits. In this case, I always leave the face blank or flat and profile very simple.”

“I do not draw eyes or noses on my portraits. The human face is always changing; the face at work is different from the face that enjoys the love. Aging changes the faces also. I want my prints to express this change. The portraits are left ambiguous so that the viewer can add his/her interpretation. This is the aspect of suggestion rather than expression. Also, I am interested in the humorous and colorful aspects of Ukiyo-e poster art.”

“In my portraits I want to incorporate an element of wit through exaggeration and distortion. For emphasis, I fill in small areas with bright, whimsical colors. To express contemporary influences I use the figure dressed in Western style. My primary source of subject matter is photographs, frequently black and white, which I tear from books, magazines and newspapers. These materials are kept in my studio or in my bag, and whenever I am ready to begin a drawing for the print, I rummage through the wrinkled images.”

“There are small transitions in my work from time to time, and my interest is always based on unpredictable texture that is printed from the etched surface of the copper plate. My prints explore the complex relationship of paper, ink and etched plates to describe my thought, as well as the relationship which occurs between figures and space to express other human experiences. Always I try to investigate the maximum potential available to me as a printmaker.”

Biography

Yuji Hiratsuka was born in Osaka, Japan. In 1973 until 1978 he studied at Tokyo Gakugei University, Koganei-shi, Tokyo, Japan. In 1978 he graduated with a BS (Batchelor of Science) in Art Education.

In 1985 the young artist, then 33 years old, decided to take a plane in Eastern direction, and moved to the United States. Hiratsuka has not been the first one to make this step. Many Japanese artists of the 20th century went to the United States – some for studies, others for teaching. Some remained only one or two years in the U.S.A. and others forever.

Yuji Hiratsuka has stayed until now in his new homeland. He first extended and intensified his studies. From 1985 until 1987 he made his MA (Master of Arts) in printmaking at New Mexico State University in Las Cruces, NM. And from 1987 until 1990 he studied at Indiana University, Bloomington, and graduated with an MFA (Master of Fine Arts) in printmaking.

In 1987 Hiratsuka began to work as an art instructor. Since 1992 he is an Associate Professor at the Department of Art, Oregon State University in Corvallis.

Technique: Chine Collé with Etching

The artist uses a mixed media combination of Chine Collé with etching. Thisis a  time-consuming printing process that requires a lot of skill and experience.

“My personal technique using Chine Collé with traditional and innovative etching is the following:

With continuous alterations to a copper plate I print a sequence of black, yellow, red and blue, passing the same plate through the press for each design and color change.

To start with; the first tones to the plate are given with line etching, drypoint, aquatint, softground, photocopy transfer or roulette. I pull my first color. With these first impressions, I work back into the plate with a scraper, burnisher and emery paper to enhance the lights and accent the motif. I then go on to the second, third and fourth colors.

Finally, the print is completed from the back with a relief process of woodcut or linocut to intensify shapes and/or colors.

I print on the paper which best suits my work; this is a thin Japanese paper known as Toyama Kozo (Japanese Mulberry). As in the French use of Chine Colle I apply glue to the back of the Kozo print and pass it through the press, with a heavier rag paper (BFK Rives or Somerset, etc.) beneath. What the viewer sees; is my four color intaglio print saturated with subtle tones that come through the back of a Toyama Kozo paper which is set deep into a rag paper.”

David Hockney

Sources:

website: http://www.hockneypictures.com  – NB strict copyright so videos only are shown here

Barringer, T., Devaney, E., Drabble, M., Gayford, M., Livingstone, M. & Salomon, X. F. 2012. David Hockney: A Bigger Picture, London, Royal Academy of the Arts.

Hudson, T. 2004. Hockney’s Pictures, Thames & Hudson.

Stevens, C. & Wilson, A. (eds.) 2017. David Hockney, London: Tate Enterprises.

Biography timeline

Google images

Hockney is important for many aspects of my illustration work:

  • interest in perspective and bending the rules
  • exploration of colour
  • use of photography, video and collage
  • use of iPad and other digital media

Use of perspective

Hockney is particularly interested in the process of seeing. This includes his examination of use of one-point perspective by ‘old masters’, and particularly the more isometric perspective used in Chinese scroll art.

Use of colour

Hockney has often experimented in his paintings with brilliant and vibrant colour combinations as in exhibitions at the Tate Britain and Royal Academy.

Born with synesthesia, Hockney sees synesthetic colours in response to musical stimuli. This does not show up in his painting or photography artwork, but is a common underlying principle in his designs for stage sets for ballet and opera—where he bases background colours and lighting on the colours he sees while listening to the piece’s music.

The “joiners” : photocollages

Photographs do not see space. We see space. Without vanishing points

In the early 1980s, Hockney began to produce photo collages, which he called “joiners”, first using Polaroid prints and subsequently 35mm, commercially-processed color prints. Using Polaroid snaps or photolab-prints of a single subject, Hockney arranged a patchwork to make a composite image. An early photomontage was of his mother. Because the photographs are taken from different perspectives and at slightly different times, the result is work that has an affinity with Cubism, one of Hockney’s major aims—discussing the way human vision works. Some pieces are landscapes, such as Pearblossom Highway #2, others portraits, such as Kasmin 1982, and My Mother, Bolton Abbey, 1982.

Creation of the “joiners” occurred accidentally. He noticed in the late sixties that photographers were using cameras with wide-angle lenses. He did not like these photographs because they looked somewhat distorted. While working on a painting of a living room and terrace in Los Angeles, he took Polaroid shots of the living room and glued them together, not intending for them to be a composition on their own. On looking at the final composition, he realized it created a narrative, as if the viewer moved through the room. He began to work more with photography after this discovery and stopped painting for a while to exclusively pursue this new technique. Frustrated with the limitations of photography and its ‘one eyed’ approach, however, he returned to painting.

Computer art

In December 1985, Hockney used the Quantel Paintbox, a computer program that allowed the artist to sketch directly onto the screen. Using the program was similar to drawing on the PET film for prints, with which he had much experience. The resulting work was featured in a BBC series that profiled a number of artists.

Since 2009, Hockney has painted hundreds of portraits, still lifes and landscapes using the Brushes iPhone and iPad application, often sending them to his friends. His show Fleurs fraîches (Fresh flowers) was held at La Fondation Pierre Bergé in Paris. A Fresh-Flowers exhibit opened in 2011 at the Royal Ontario Museum in Toronto, featuring more than 100 of his drawings on 25 iPads and 20 iPods. In late 2011, Hockney revisited California to paint Yosemite National Park on his iPad. For the season 2012–2013 in the Vienna State Opera he designed, on his iPad, a large scale picture (176 sqm) as part of the exhibition series Safety Curtain, conceived by museum in progress.

Google images for iPad art

iphone drawings

 Portraits

David Hockney’s portraits in crayon, ink, water colour and paint show an amazing sensitivity in treatment and line.

Google images of David Hockney portraits

In October 2006 National Portrait Gallery in London organized one of the largest ever displays of Hockney’s portraiture work, including 150 paintings, drawings, prints, sketchbooks, and photocollages from over five decades. The collection ranged from his earliest self-portraits to work he completed in 2005. Hockney assisted in displaying the works and the exhibition, which ran until January 2007, was one of the gallery’s most successful.

See article on 2006 exhibition at the National Portrait Gallery by Janet McKenzie

 

 

 

Tom Burns

Source: website http://www.tomburns.co.uk (but this does not have the work I like).

Between Clarke and Hilldale

Tom Burns is a London based Illustrator. His work combines digital techniques with collage and the use of more traditional screen-printing processes. He has worked for a range of international clients in advertising, publishing, editorial and design. His clients include The Folio Society, BBC, British Heart Foundation, The Globe & Mail, Harvard Business Review, Readers Digest, The Boston Globe, Q Magazine, BBDO, Financial Times, The Guardian, John Brown publishing, Kingston University, Advocate Magazine, Advocate, Virago Press, Billboard Magazine, Serino/Coyne, National Magazine, CNN Money Magazine, American Airlines.

The images below are from my Illustration 1 logbook and no longer available on-line. They are part of my visual inspiration for Assignment 2: Cambridge and Assignment 4: Aldeburgh


Martin O’Neill

Sources:

Cut it Out

Martin O’Neill is a British illustrator and collage artist. His enigmatic textured images combine collage, silkscreen, photography, paint, and digital techniques. He works from a vast archive of found and self generated material and also works with stock and supplied imagery.

My favourite images – for their mysterious ambiguity:


Geoff Grandfield

Sources:

Website http://geoffgrandfield.co.uk . (see particularly Narrative)

Caustic Cover Critic Interview

Geoff Grandfield is a British illustrator now living in London. He has worked with major newspapers and publishers since 1987.

Influenced by the cinematography of film noir and the reductivism of modernist graphic art, his work is characterised by carefully composed minimalist silhouettes and limited palette, exaggerated perspective and scale contrasts. The bold shapes and perspective have a very strong immediate impact. Other meanings and shapes are often hidden and it is only by following the lines that the meaning of images become revealed.

Grandfield draws with chalk pastel, usually the German make Schminke, and sometimes Talens. “When I work for black and white reproduction I use tones of grey. The tones have some ‘colour’ in them, but mostly I’m going by the weight and contrast between areas. Colour is another thing and I try to prioritise a particular set of colours for a result.” Since 2001 he has been using Photoshop to scan and prepare for reproduction, which in turn has changed the visual look of my work. He scans his originals at A4.

Flattened perspective

Towards the Houses
Home project
He was Already Dead
The man within

Narrative

The Captain and the Enemy
The Honorary Consul
Our man in Havana

Fashion

Fashion invite 2013
Fashion invite 2014
Fashion invite 2011
Fashion invite 2008