Catherine Anyango

website http://catherine-anyango.com

Catherine Anyango uses film, sculpture and mise-en-scene devices to reconstruct physical environments that are disrupted by psychological, intangible phenomena. Many of her images are powerful graphite black and white drawings, often dealing with political issues.

Heart of Darkness 2010, a graphic novel adaptation of Conrad’s novel about colonialism

She has produced live film events around London, including the Victoria & Albert Museum and the National Film Theatre.

Current projects look at the emotional manifestations of crime and guilt upon public and private space.

In upcoming graphic novel 2×2 the banality of corruption affects the physical structure of a city and in recent drawings of crime scenes and police violence the images act as subjective evidence of horror.

She studied at St Martins and the Royal College of Art followed by an MA in English Literature at UCL. Since then she has exhibited at Art Basel Miami Beach, the London Design Festival, Guest Projects and Design Miami Basel. She is currently a Tutor in Visual Research at the Royal College of Art.o

Adam Simpson

Source: website: http://www.adsimpson.com

Adam Simpson creates digital illustrations which create atmosphere through a minimalist palette and exaggerated/contradictory/flat/isometric perspectives, often with directional shadows.

Flat perspective

Moby – An architectural playlist: Electronic musician, Moby, created a list of buildings and their perfect musical accompaniment. These artworks were commissioned to accompany the eight pairings.

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Isometric perspective

Film Posters: Artwork commissioned by Studio Small for BAFTA. Each artwork is inspired by one of the 5 Best Film nominees in 2011: The Kings Speech, Black Swan, True Grit, Inception and The Social Network.

Boundaries: A floor-to-ceiling artwork, appearing on all sides of an elevator vestibule at the ‘Boundary Hotel’, situated on Boundary Street in East London. The artwork was devised around a grid of boundary walls. Each segment is approximately 170mm square. The aim was to take an alternative approach to dealing with the seemingly dead space of an elevator interior, by immersing the visitor in an epic artwork, which is impossible to absorb in one short trip. Each journey offers a chance to study a new scene: a geometric toile de jouy, of sorts.

Loveth Well: Artwork inspired by the final scene of The Rime of the Ancient Mariner by Samuel Taylor Coleridge. Created for Beat.

Saul Bass

I want to make beautiful things, even if nobody cares, as opposed to ugly things. That’s my intent.

‘’try to reach for a simple, visual phrase that tells you what the picture is all about and evokes the essence of the story”

“making the ordinary extraordinary”

“The nature of process, to one degree or another, involves failure. You have at it. It doesn’t work. You keep pushing. It gets better. But it’s not good. It gets worse. You got at it again. Then you desperately stab at it, believing “this isn’t going to work.” And it does!” by Saul Bass

Source: Wikipedia article

Book: Saul Bass (to be done)

Saul Bass (1920 – 1996) was an American graphic designer and Academy Award winning filmmaker, best known for his design of motion picture title sequences, film posters, and corporate logos. Much of Saul Bass’s work was made in close collaboration with his wife Elaine.

During his 40-year career Bass worked for some of Hollywood’s most prominent filmmakers, including Alfred Hitchcock, Otto Preminger, Billy Wilder, Stanley Kubrick and Martin Scorsese. For Alfred Hitchcock, Bass provided effective, memorable title sequences, inventing a new type of kinetic typography, for North by Northwest (1959), Vertigo (1958), working with John Whitney, and Psycho (1960). Among his most famous title sequences are the animated paper cut-out of a heroin addict’s arm for Preminger’s The Man with the Golden Arm, the credits racing up and down what eventually becomes a high-angle shot of a skyscraper in Hitchcock’s North by Northwest, and the disjointed text that races together and apart in Psycho.

Bass aimed to get the audience to see familiar parts of their world in an unfamiliar way. Examples of this or what he described as “making the ordinary extraordinary” can be seen in Walk on the Wild Side (1962) where an ordinary cat becomes a mysterious prowling predator, and in Nine Hours to Rama (1963) where the interior workings of a clock become an expansive new landscape.

Poster images

Anatomy of a Murder

Film title sequences

Published on 3 Apr 2014

Some of the most remarkable opening titles designed by Saul Bass, sometimes in collaboration with his wife Elaine Bass. From “The Man with the Golden Arm” (1955) to “Casino” (1995), this video represents a substantial part of his creative legacy in chronological order.

Bass also designed some of the most iconic corporate logos in North America, including the Bell System logo in 1969, as well as AT&T’s globe logo in 1983 after the breakup of the Bell System. He also designed Continental Airlines’ 1968 jet stream logo and United Airlines’ 1974 tulip logo, which became some of the most recognized airline industry logos of the era.

Why Man [sic] Creates

 

explores the process, results, and social and philosophical implications of creativity. But as if women never existed or created anything!