Aldeburgh Diary

My rough notes using One Note and photo diary.

Overview

Day 1 Sunday Hambling. Wave, turbulence. Sunset. Fenced off beach.

Day 2 Monday. Kovats. Many tales. Ink. Gloomy darkness with yellow sea poppies. Twisted nets, ensnaring.

Day 3 Tuesday Stories in textures hilary mantell. Filling in the gaps. Museum. Ancient times. The Magpie. Viking. Armada.

Day 4 Wed where does all the time go. Med houses. Marsh. Nostalgia.

Day 5 Thur william kentridge erasure/ black and white charcoal

Dat 6 Fri coetzee open studios beach dog dance. New ideas, opening up.

Day 7 Sat new dawn. Watercolour.

Sunday 11th June

Sun and cloud. 18/19c Windy. 18/19.
Smell of mown grass.
Cuckoos in the morning.

Walk into town. See Hambling Edge (is there gold on there?) and Walls of Water. Do iPad for Hambling, oil painting. Different textures. Do video and photos of sea.

Band on beach. Acoustic guitar. But not many people. Town feels quite empty.

Look at Lemenech Gill gouache. Multilayered and paint on top with white gouache, erasing. Pencil sketching. But good drawing. Use of muted colours.

Elizabeth Newcombe oils Paris. Cut out and exaggeration of shapes. Use complementary colours in overpainting. ‘Paris as I want it to be, Paris of memory, not as it is….’

Wind dies down at sunset. Fans in the sky. Then cloud again.

Walk along the beach to Thorpeness. Areas of beach fenced off to protect the plants.

Backdrop discussions on election fall out. Uncertainty.

Maggi Hambling

“I am the shifting shingle, you approach with stealth, then the dark rooms of your curves, I am tossed, lost, displaced, with greedy lovers’ tongues and lips, you suck in and in again. we rise together, we rise together, then float safe on liquid breasts until the dance begins again and you thrust deep and my resistance is low, dissolve, dissolve. no defence against your relentless advance. I am but a ghost of the shore, disappeared in you.” (Maggi Hambling 2009 You Are the Sea text)

Subsequent research on Sizewell

In the 30s, the first tests in the development of radar were done there. The site was focused on bomb ballistics during the second world war and, afterwards, the first nuclear weapons. Now it’s a deserted haven for wild birds but littered with clues to its past.

Walking around the site I found the mysterious buildings of the Atomic Weapons Research Establishment (AWRE): bunker architecture covered in huge mounds of shingle. Peering through locked gates, I saw light pouring in through roofs open to the sky, the rusting metal framework creating dramatic shadows across walls tinted green with algae. I tried to piece together what they may have contained – deep pits to house the bombs for environmental testing, rusting remains of control boxes on the walls, huge ventilation shafts, quiet now save for the alarm call of gulls.

One of the most extraordinary things about the Ness is that at points you can see nothing except shingle and the occasional military building; the horizon remains the same through 360 degrees. It is quite otherworldly.

https://www.theguardian.com/travel/2009/apr/05/orford-ness

 

Wikipedia: Crag Pit, Aldeburgh is a 0.2 hectare geological Site of Special Scientific Interest in Aldeburgh in Suffolk.It is a Geological Conservation Review site,and within the Suffolk Coast and Heaths Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty.

Site of Special Scientific Interest

Crag Pit, Aldeburgh 1.jpg

Area of Search

Suffolk

Grid reference

TM 458 580 [1]

Interest

Geological

Area

0.2 hectares[1]

Notification

1987[1]

Location map

Magic Map

Crag Pit, Aldeburgh

This is the most northern site which exposes the Pliocene Coralline Crag Formationaround five million years ago. It has rich and diverse fossils, including many bryozoans, and other fauna include serpulids and several boring forms.[5]

This site, which has been filled in, is on private land with no public access.

Monday 12th June

Cloudy, and wind. Light at 3.30 am.
Rabbit hops along. Bottom of new hedges protected.
Woke up really late and long breakfast to lunch.
Take more video of sea, gets over my shoes. Shingle between the toes.

Read Kovats drawing water.

Drawing as a mechanism for exploration. Drawing as lines of discovery.
Mapping
3D under the oceans

Preface quote from Salman Rushdie on Haroun and the Sea of Stories.

He looked into the water and saw that it was made up of a thousand thousand thousand and one different currents, each one a different colour, weaving in and out of each other like a liquid tapestry of breathtaking complexity; and Iff explained that these were the Streams of Story, that each coloured strand represented and contained a single tale.

Different parts of the Ocean contained different sorts of stories, and as all the stories that had ever been told and many others that were still in the process of being invented could be found here, the Ocean of the Streams of Story was in fact the biggest library in the universe. And because the stories were held here in fluid form, they retained the ability to change, to become new versions of themselves, to join up with other stories and so become yet other stories; so that unlike a library of books, the Ocean of the Streams of Story was much more like a storeroom of yarns. It was not dead but alive.

Salman Rushdie, Haroun and the Sea of Stories, 1990.p55.

Me ideas: slowing down time. Time looking back. Not frenetic.

Van is shell sheltering from the storm.

Profile Arlene Foster DUP. Troubles and death. Uncertainty on election.

Tuesday 13th June

Cloudy and windy 20C

Reith lectures. The day is for the living Hillary Mantell. About history and fiction. Lots of imperfect perspective fragments and filling in the gaps.

Podcast

Read Ronald Blythe and look through history photos. Storms and Slaughden.
Sorted sketchbook.

Afternoon go to museum. Old Anglo saxon, and Roman dig.
Back through churchyard with Benjamin Britten and Peter Pears. and along leafy tunnel lane.

Worked on gouache, pastel and ink bleed brushes.
Went back through carnival sketches.

Feeling despondent – not enough time and too much to learn. About technique and about drawing.

Wed 14th June

Sunny 18C
Soul Music Radio 4
Sandy Denny Who Knows Where the Time Goes. Wrote from nowhere when she was 17. Confident on stage, very unconfident off stage. Depression, drinking etc with duffucult marriage. Seems like she committed suicide through falling down stairs.

Across the evening sky, all the birds are leaving
But how can they know it’s time for them to go?
Before the winter fire, I will still be dreaming
I have no thought of time

For who knows where the time goes?
Who knows where the time goes?

Sad, deserted shore, your fickle friends are leaving
Ah, but then you know it’s time for them to go
But I will still be here, I have no thought of leaving
I do not count the time

For who knows where the time goes?
Who knows where the time goes?

And I am not alone while my love is near me
I know it will be so until it’s time to go
So come the storms of winter and then the birds in spring again
I have no fear of time

For who knows how my love grows?
And who knows where the time goes?

Read more: Sandy Denny – Who Knows Where The Time Goes? Lyrics | MetroLyrics

Interview with young songwriter ren harvieu who had been out with friends. In dark they were jumping over hedges. One did not see her and jumped on top and broke her back. As she was pain relieved suddenly started singing the song. Nina simone rendering also.

Sketching on bench. Got a bit cold.

Hot midday. Mediterranean streets. By lookout tower. Band midday.

Practised acrylic styles. Old brush.

Went to the marsh. Footpath right across is closed.

Day of Kensington fire.

 

Thursday 15th June

Still discussing Kensington fire.
Hot morning so stayed in. Feeling tired. Then cloudy and windy. Starts to be sunny again about 3pm.

William Kentridge. That which is not drawn.

  • Provisionality. Virtues of bastardy. Receiving the world. Reversing the world.
    To reveal that which is hidden. Excess of making.
    Making 3 things at once, the cat and the coffee pot. Chaos.
    Unwinding, unfurling, contradiction.
    Changing, shifting. Erasing.
    To make a huge fiction.
  • Sighs and traces. Always longing for meaning. Mystery associated with the trace.
  • Drawer and viewer. Filling in the gaps.
  • Wanting to hold, needing to let go.
  • Slow drawing. Meditative.
  • Man is a walking clock. Gathering seconds, gleaning frames.
  • P6 “the migration of images, which is connected with what I am calling the virtues of bastardy and the question of provisionality. That is linked to questions of imperfect translation and construction. I am thinking here of a bridge or a plank over the gap of what you don’t hear or don’t understand, or of what’s not in the narrative and requires the activity of the viewer. I think it’s all part of one topic, but we have to try and find out in what ways they are related. Another concerns that which is hidden….excavating dreams and constructing their sense. And erasure as construction.”
  • P71″I suppose I’m interested in the traces of what prompts a reconstruction, not just the trace nor the unreconstructed state. What prods an imaginative leap? I am making a drawing for which you see a foundation or a ground. And the interest for me is not not only the foundation or the ground but also what it suggests. From all the different possible things that could come out of it, I am interested in the end, in arriving at one, even if it’s an incorrect one. So it’s not a matter if saying, ‘Here’s a phrase, which is unclear, because there are words missing, that I haven’t heard.’ That suggests many things; it’s the leap into that suggestion, which is, in away, a leap out of indeterminacy. So indeterminacy is there at the base, but for me the interest lies in the movement into a drawing, into a sequence of movement. Indeterminacy suggests paralysis if you stay there.”
  • Photographs have only one focal point. But when we look we rapidly flip between the two.

Friday 16th June

Sun and cloud

Went out. Bought cards.
Boats watercolour
Tractor acrylic
Pointillist textures

Old Man of Orford

James Dodds linocut The Old Man of Orford

Orford Castle is associated with the legend of the Wild Man of Orford. According to the chronicler Ralph of Coggeshall, a naked wild man, covered in hair, was caught in the nets of local fishermen around 1167. The man was brought back to the castle where he was held for six months, being questioned or tortured; he said nothing, and behaved in a feral fashion throughout. The wild man finally escaped from the castle. Later accounts described the captive as a merman, and the incident appears to have encouraged the growth in “wild men” carvings on local baptismal fonts – around twenty such fonts from the later medieval period exist in coastal areas of Suffolk and Norfolk, near Orford.

Orford Castle Wikipedia

Saturday 17th June

Dawn and dusk

Aldeburgh Studios
Brian Coetzee and seagulls

Crag Path and dancing dog

Sunday 18th June

Home via Snape

Sequential Illustration

Sequential illustration responds to narrative through a sequence of images, visualising it over time through cartoon strips and graphic novels, storyboards and animations. Although writing may exist within cartoons, the images are more dominant. Visually, sequential illustrations make use of the idea of the frame and camera lens and construct the story by careful use of different types of edits.
Will Eisner ‘Theory of Comics and Sequential Art’ downloadable pdf

Types of narrative

Simple narratives have  a beginning, middle and end: the protagonist has a problem at the start, encounters conflict through the middle and reaches resolution at the end…. What makes the story complex, wonderful, entertaining or tragic are the details of the characters, the setting, the plot of the narrative and the genre in which it’s set. ‘ Course text p87.

In some cases genre codes and conventions may provide the reader/viewer with some certainty as to what they’re about to experience. On the other hand, genres may be deliberately mixed to spice things up.

Framing and storyboards

All forms of sequential illustration use the idea of the frame or panel in some way to move the narrative along. This uses visual language from film and TV – varying close-ups, mid or long shots of what’s going on. Like film, distinct grammars may be used in different genres.

Action: Sequential illustrations, unlike moving image or animation, have to represent movement and action via the static medium of drawing. Action has to be implied. This is often done through association, showing people mid-walk, cars moving, actions taking place, but it can also be
done through careful use of editing, jump cutting from scene to scene.

Sounds: Like actions, sounds have to be implied in sequential illustrations. Speech bubbles do the job of conveying the spoken word in a number of different ways, but actual sounds are often represented onomatopoeically, or as they sound. These KAPOWs, BRRRRRMs and WHOOOOSHs are further enhanced through the use of visual typography, creating fractured words, letters falling downwards or bursting out, anything that helps bring that sound to life.

Narrative research

Cartoon strip

Cartoon strips are perhaps the simplest form of sequential illustration. They may be said to originate in the stone carving narratives of many ancient civilisations. Early Renaissance examples had narratives running across panels.

Very simple cartoons may consist of just 3 frames using a very tight narrative of simple beginning, middle, end. Other cartoons are longer with more space to develop the story, either with more panels or a continuous story over several episodes.

Comic books

The comic book extends the cartoon strip into a publication, with longer pieces and more specific content. Fashions come and go and they vary in their drawing complexity. Comics include:

  • Weekly and annual comics for children and ‘would-still-be’ children: DC and Marvel comics of the 40s and 50s, The Beano, Dan Dare
  • Japanese Manga
  • 1960s counterculture with artists like Robert Crumb
  • 1970s punk with artists like Gary Painter
  • 1980s Viz comics for adults
Graphic novels

In the graphic novel, the basic form of the cartoon is extended to cover longer narratives. Often graphic novelists focus on more complex forms of narrative and, as the term ‘novel’ suggests, see themselves more as a part of the world of literature than comics. Graphic novels can be created by an illustrator-author or be a collaboration between an illustrator and an author.

Storyboards

The image remains free of any speech bubbles, descriptions or sounds; instead, this information is presented at the bottom of each frame, with additional information on the type of edit being used and how long for. Storyboards are more functional than other forms of sequential illustration; they’re a form of visual idea development specifically for the moving image.

Research:  Pick some examples of of comic book, cartoon and graphic novel artists:

  • What’s the relationship between the narrative and the style of drawing being used?
  • Which is most important in making the story work?

 

Kafka Metamorphosis

Kafka’s short story The Metamorphosis (Die Verwandlung), first published in 1915, is the tale of a man called Gregor who wakes up one day to find himself transformed into a beetle. The story then explores how Gregor and his parents deal with this transformation. The Metamorphosis is set in Gregor’s bedroom in his parents’ house, and the door of the room
becomes an important visual metaphor for being trapped.

Research how different illustrators have tackled this story. You’ll find that there’s a limited range of images – the bedroom door, the beetle and the bed. How have illustrators used these elements?

Extend your research to look at film, artists, theatre, TV and other visual representations. Where in the narrative have artists placed the image – before, after or during the transformation? How have illustrators’ choices framed your understanding of what the story is about? Which do you
think is the most successful version?

Illustrations

My favourites: Luis Scafati

http://fer1972.tumblr.com/post/119459616559/franz-kafka-and-the-metamorphosis-illustrations

original cover
original cover
Rich Johnson: Poor Mr Samesby!
Rich Johnson: Poor Mr Samesby!

 

Erin Shore: Get Back!
Erin Shores: Get Back!
Rohan Daniel Eason: Creepy Cute KJafka for kids
Rohan Daniel Eason: Creepy Cute KJafka for kids
A B Yehoshua
A B Yehoshua