Michael Craig-Martin

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Official website

Wikipedia

Tate

Sir Michael Craig-Martin (born 28 August 1941) is an Irish-British contemporary conceptual artist and painter. He is noted for fostering the Young British Artists, many of whom he taught, and for his conceptual artwork, An Oak Tree. He is Emeritus Professor of Fine Art at Goldsmiths. His memoir and advice for the aspiring artist, On Being An Artist, was published by London-based publisher Art / Books in April 2015.

His art is characterised by flat colour and line.

Wyndham Lewis

Wikipedia

WikiArt

Percy Wyndham Lewis (1882 – 1957) was an English writer, painter and critic.  He was a co-founder of the Vorticist movement in art, and edited the literary magazine of the Vorticists, BLAST.

He painted distorted portraits and violent angular abstracts influenced by cubism and futurism. He was fascinated by the lights, speed and towering geometry of city life. He dreamed of a mechanical paradise and new society. But his robotic figures look trapped in a nightmare.

 

Gary Hume

Tate images

Gary Hume paints large abstract paintings of people and everyday life, with expressive use of colour and sensuous shapes in enamel paint and impasto.

Influenced:

2.4 A Rose by another name: Phlomis

4.1: Caricature and Character: Bob Geldof

Overview of life and work

STOUT, K. (ed.) 2013. Gary Hume, London: Tate Publishing.

Wikipedia

Gary Stewart Hume was born in 1962 in Tenterden, Kent.

Late 1980s: In 1988 he graduated from Goldsmiths College where he was one of the ‘YBAs’. His work was included in both Freeze, an exhibition organised by Damien Hirst in 1988, and East Country Yard, a warehouse exhibition organised by Henry Bond and Sarah Lucas in 1990.

Hume has become known for depicting everyday subjects using high-gloss industrial paints.[4] His earliest notable works are his “door paintings”, life-size representations of hospital doors. These proved a critical success, being shown in Germany and the United States, as well as attracting the attention of collector Charles Saatchi. Hume’s work was included in the 1995 exhibition Brilliant!, a showcase of work by YBA artists. In 1997, his work was included in Sensation, a touring show of the Charles Saatchi art collection at the Royal Academy, London.

Hume abandoned doors in the mid-1990s, turning to paintings in household gloss paint on aluminium panel, for these often used appropriated images, including pictures of celebrities (e.g. DJ Tony Blackburn) and animals. Their forms and colours are dramatically simplified, with people being reduced to just two or three colours. Snowman (1996), for example, is made up of three shades of red, showing a circle on top of a larger circle against a lighter background. At first, Hume used mainly bright colours, but later pieces have used more muted tones.

Around 2005, Hume revisited his Door pictures, this time anthropomorphising the doors, arranging them into pairs of lovers and giving them the titles The Couple and The Argument.[5] Hume’s “Yellow Window,” [6] from 2002, broke records when sold at auction at Christie’s.[7] The work inspired a later limited edition entitled “1000 Windows,” produced for London’s Tate Modern in 2013.[8]

Besides his London studio, Hume maintains a second studio in a converted barn on the grounds of a former chicken farm in New York’s Catskill Mountains region.[9]

Philosophy and approach to painting[edit]

In 2012, Hume made an exhibition titled ‘Indifferent Owl’. Speaking about his work in 2011, Hume had stated, ‘Where I live in New York, there’s a wood. I heard an owl in the night. Next day I found one of those “Happy Birthday” balloons caught in the trees. It had almost deflated. I imagined the owl, utterly indifferent, watching the balloon float by as it slowly collapsed. That’s how I see life. I’m the owl, totally disengaged as the balloon bobs by…’[10]

Water Painting, 1999, Tate Collection. Part of Hume’s “Water” Series of paintings.

Exhibitions[edit]

Hume represented Great Britain at the 1999 Venice Biennale, where he showed his Water series, a number of superimposed line drawings of women (again, these were gloss paint on aluminium). His work was the subject of a one-person exhibition at Whitechapel Gallery, London, in 1999. Later monographic shows of Hume’s work were organised at the Kestnergesellschaft, Hannover, and the Kunsthaus Bregenz, Austria, in 2004, and Modern Art Oxford mounted a survey show of his Door paintings in 2008.[11]

Recognition[edit]

In 1996, Hume was nominated for the Turner Prize, but lost out to Douglas Gordon. He was later awarded Great Britain’s 1997 Jerwood Painting Prize.[12] Hume was elected a Royal Academician in 2001.

Architectural Illustration Approaches

Key Resources on architectural illustration

The Society of Architectural Illustrators

Represents ‘professionals who bring architecture to life’. Their illustrators / SAI members A–Z section shows a wide range of different approaches.
www.sai.org.uk

Archigram (1961–1974)
A group of architects influenced by avant-garde art movements who playfully challenged assumptions about modern architecture. All of their work was presented as proposals, through drawings and collage. A very different approach to representing and visualising architecture through drawing.

Illustration web Architecture Section

The Royal Institute of British Architecture (RIBA)
Has a series of online workshops, videos and other resources exploring architectural history, drawing and design. Useful to gain a broader perspective on architectural ideas.
www.architecture.com

Michael Blower archive
Examples of British architect Michael Blower’s sketchbooks are available via the website:
http://www.vads.ac.uk

Photorealistic 3D and CGI imaging

Top of the list of Google Search for Architectural Illustration are companies doing photorealistic 3D and CGI imaging, some with animation. This is a very specialised field requiring a high level of 3D Digital skill – not something I could aspire to.

RenderImage

GNet3D

Graphite/ink/charcoal

Michael Vaughan
Michael; Vaughan
Michael; Vaughan
Michael Vaughan
Michael Vaughan

Watercolour/ink and wash/acrylic

Some of this merges into street/travel illustration.

Philip Bannister
Philip Bannister watercolour
Philip Bannister watercolour
Philip Bannister ink
Philip Bannister ink
John Walsom

He sets up perspective views on a drawing board in the traditional way and uses a range of stencils for ellipses and curves, working with pencils, brushes and paint. His watercolour images are usually more detailed and accurate than his acrylic paintings. He spends more time doing the drawing than the painting. He also paints in oils en plein air – he likes to work fast with the changing light.

John Walsom
John Walsom
John Walsom
John Walsom

Mixed media

Lucia Emanuela Curzi

Lucia often brings together lots of photographic references and creates a preliminary collage as well as doing some sketches. Her actual illustrations are created on paper using ink, watercolour, pastels, pens or acrylic – though not necessarily all together.  However she does use Photoshop to tweak and perfect a piece. Also fashion.

Lucia Emanuela Curzi
Lucia Emanuela Curzi
Lucia Emanuela Curzi
Lucia Emanuela Curzi

Digital

 

Fujio Yoshida
Fujio Yoshida
Fujio Yoshida
Fujio Yoshida
Fujio Yoshida
Mike Hall

Clean with some Photorealism. Hand-drawn imagery and coloured digitally. Sometimes he combines drawn print designs with digital elements to build up an image. Sometimes, he’ll also draw his map designs using vector graphics.

Mike Hall
Mike Hall
Mike Hall
Mike Hall
Cliff Mills

more stylised influenced by Pop Art. Drawn with pen and ink then scanned and coloured in Photoshop.

Cliff Mills
Cliff Mills
Cliff Mills
Cliff Mills
Juliet Percival

She works from a graphite or pen drawing, sometimes with a subtle watercolour background. This is scanned in and coloured digitally using Photoshop’s brushes or flat colours.

Juliet Percival
Juliet Percival
Juliet Percival
Juliet Percival
Decue Wu

Uses different compositions, and bold colors in a limited palette, often creating patterns. Most of her work is done using Photoshop and Illustrator, but she also combines hand-made textures, screenprinting and collage work. Also does Fashion.

Decu Wu
Decu Wu
Decue Wu
Decue Wu
Thilo Rothaker
Thilo Rothaker
Thilo Rothaker
Thilo Rothaker
Thilo Rothaker

3D Sculpture

Model Making on SAI

Tobias Wustefeld

Tobias creates little worlds in bringing together digital and traditional techniques. He draws designs by hand and finishes them in 3D with the computer.

Tobias Wustefeld
Tobias Wustefeld
Tobias Wustefeld
Tobias Wustefeld
Alex Hogrefe
Alex Hogrefe
Alex Hogrefe

Visualising Architecture

Interesting Tutorial on using SketchUp

Andre Chiote
Andre Chiote ?ercedes Benw Building
Andre Chiote Mercedes Benz Building

5 abstract illustrations

Alessandro Gottardo

Sources:

Shout website

AWWW awards

Alessandro Gottardo aka Shout is an Italian artist, illustrator and designer. His very simple and surreal ‘meaning of life’ images are very carefully controlled, generally amusing, but also very poignant. He uses a very limited palette, flat colours and thin lines, playing with visual contrasts in size and different perspectives.

Video of selection of his work:

Flat perspective and pattern


Minimalist surrealist humour


Surrealist angst

Biography

He studied at a specialist art high school in Venice and in the Illustration department of the Istituto Europeo di Design in Milano. He creates visual art projects for advertising campaigns, design products and publishers in four continents. SHOUT images  have been featured in these following prestigious annuals: Communications Arts, American Illustrators, Society of Illustrators and 3×3 Magazine.

Adam Simpson

Source: website: http://www.adsimpson.com

Adam Simpson creates digital illustrations which create atmosphere through a minimalist palette and exaggerated/contradictory/flat/isometric perspectives, often with directional shadows.

Flat perspective

Moby – An architectural playlist: Electronic musician, Moby, created a list of buildings and their perfect musical accompaniment. These artworks were commissioned to accompany the eight pairings.

See more

Isometric perspective

Film Posters: Artwork commissioned by Studio Small for BAFTA. Each artwork is inspired by one of the 5 Best Film nominees in 2011: The Kings Speech, Black Swan, True Grit, Inception and The Social Network.

Boundaries: A floor-to-ceiling artwork, appearing on all sides of an elevator vestibule at the ‘Boundary Hotel’, situated on Boundary Street in East London. The artwork was devised around a grid of boundary walls. Each segment is approximately 170mm square. The aim was to take an alternative approach to dealing with the seemingly dead space of an elevator interior, by immersing the visitor in an epic artwork, which is impossible to absorb in one short trip. Each journey offers a chance to study a new scene: a geometric toile de jouy, of sorts.

Loveth Well: Artwork inspired by the final scene of The Rime of the Ancient Mariner by Samuel Taylor Coleridge. Created for Beat.

Eric Ravillious

Eric William Ravilious (1903 – 1942) was an English painter, designer, book illustrator and wood engraver. He grew up in East Sussex, and at the Royal College of Art (1922–5) was taught by Paul Nash and became close friends with Edward Bawden. In 1939 he officially served as a war artist, and died when the aircraft he was in was lost off Iceland.

He is particularly known for his watercolours of the South Downs, empty rooms and war paintings. His use of watercolour and limited muted palette to capture light, often overlaid by crayon lines, has a beautiful shimmering quality. He uses exaggerated perspectives, unusual viewpoints and abstract shapes to create drama, suspense and movement. The effect is often haunting – reflecting a mix of nostalgia and foreboding in the world destroyed by the war.

Sources:

CONSTABLE, F. & SIMON, S. 2003. The England of Eric Ravillious, Surrey, UK, Lund Humphrey.

Tate Gallery

Wikipedia

Dulwich Picture Gallery exhibition 2015

Selected images to music

Use of perspective

His use of two point perspective – slightly off – creates a feeling of claustrophobia, uncertainty and unease. The eye goes first towards the bed, strangely reflected in the ceiling of a windowless room. But then is taken down the empty corridor that appears to go upwards to nowhere and round a corner to the light. Is this an escape? Or a dead-end to nowhere? Or worse?

 

M C Escher

Sources:

Official website: http://www.mcescher.com

Piller, M., Elliott, P. & Peterse, F. 2015. The Amazing World of M.C.Escher, Edinburgh, UK, National Galleries of Scotland.

Wikipedia

Maurits Cornelis Escher (1898-1972)  played with architecture, perspective and impossible spaces. He aimed to show reality is wondrous, comprehensible and fascinating. During his lifetime, made 448 lithographs, woodcuts and wood engravings and over 2000 drawings and sketches. Apart from being a graphic artist, M.C. Escher illustrated books, designed tapestries, postage stamps and murals.

Perspective

Hand with Reflecting Sphere
Tower of Babel

Impossible constructions

 

Convex and Concave
Still Life and Street

Transformation Prints

Day and Night

Realism

He also made more realistic work during the time he lived and traveled in Italy. Castrovalva for example, shows Escher’s fascination for high and low, close by and far away. The lithograph Atrani, a small town on the Amalfi Coast was made in 1931, but comes back for example, in his masterpiece Metamorphosis I and II.

Lynd Ward

Trailer — “O Brother Man: The Art and Life of Lynd Ward”

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Gods’ men HD

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The Biggest Bear

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Google images

Lynd Kendall Ward (June 26, 1905 – June 28, 1985) was an American artist and storyteller, known for his series of wordless novels using wood engraving, and his illustrations for juvenile and adult books. His wordless novels have influenced the development of the graphic novel. Strongly associated with his wood engravings, he also worked in watercolor, oil, brush and ink, lithography and mezzotint. Ward was a son of Methodist minister and political organizer Harry F. Ward.

Life

Lynd Kendall Ward was born on June 26, 1905, in Chicago, Illinois. His father, Harry F. Ward, was born in Chiswick, England, in 1873; the elder Ward was a Methodist who moved to the United States in 1891 after reading the progressive Social Aspects of Christianity (1889) by Richard T. Ely.

Ward was early drawn to art, and decided to become an artist when his first-grade teacher told him that “Ward” spelled backward is “draw”. Ward studied fine arts at Columbia Teachers College in New York. He edited the Jester of Columbia, to which he contributed arts and crafts how-to articles.

Ward studied as a special one-year student at the National Academy of Graphic Arts and Bookmaking in Leipzig.  He learned etching from Alois Kolb, lithography from Georg Alexander Mathéy, and wood engraving from Hans Alexander “Theodore” Mueller; Ward was particularly influenced by Mueller. Ward chanced across a copy of Flemish artist Frans Masereel‘s wordless novel The Sun (1919), a story told in sixty-three silent woodcuts.

Ward returned to the United States in September 1927, and a number of book publishers in his portfolio. In 1928, his first commissioned work illustrated Dorothy Rowe‘s The Begging Deer: Stories of Japanese Children with eight brush drawings. May helped with background research for the illustrations, and wrote another book of Japanese folk tales, Prince Bantam (1929), with illustrations by Ward. Other work at the time included illustrations for the children’s book Little Blacknose by Hildegarde Swift, and an illustrated edition of Oscar Wilde‘s poem “Ballad of Reading Gaol“.

In 1929, Ward was inspired to create a wordless novel of his own after he came across German artist Otto Nückel‘s Destiny (1926). The first American wordless novel, Gods’ Man was published by Smith & Cape that October, the week before the Wall Street Crash of 1929; over the next four years, it sold more than 20,000 copies.[11] He made five more such works: Madman’s Drum (1930), Wild Pilgrimage (1932), Prelude to a Million Years (1933),Song Without Words (1936), and Vertigo (1937).

In addition to woodcuts, Ward also worked in watercolor, oil, brush and ink, lithography and mezzotint. Ward illustrated over a hundred children’s books, several of which were collaborations with his wife, May McNeer. Starting in 1938, Ward became a frequent illustrator of the Heritage Limited Editions Club’s series of classic works. He was well known for the political themes of his artwork, often addressing labor and class issues. In 1932 he founded Equinox Cooperative Press. He was a member of the Society of Illustrators, the Society of American Graphic Arts, and the National Academy of Design. Ward retired to his home in Reston, Virginia, in 1979. He died on June 28, 1985, two days after his 80th birthday.

In celebration of the art and life of this American printmaker and illustrator, independent filmmaker Michael Maglaras of 217 Films produced a new film titled “O Brother Man: The Art and Life of Lynd Ward.” The documentary features an interview with the artist’s daughter Robin Ward Savage, as well as more than 150 works from all periods of Ward’s career. The 94-minute documentary, culled from over 7 hours of film and narrated by Maglaras, premiered at Penn State University Libraries, Foster Auditorium, on April 20, 2012, where it was warmly received. Penn State’s Special Collections Library has also become the repository for much Lynd Ward material, and may continue to receive material from Ward family collections.

 Novels in woodcuts

Ward is known for his wordless novels told entirely through dramatic wood engravings. Ward’s first work, Gods’ Man (1929), uses a blend of Art Deco and Expressionist styles to tell the story of an artist’s struggle with his craft, his seduction and subsequent abuse by money and power, his escape to innocence, and his unavoidable doom. Ward, in employing the concept of the wordless pictorial narrative, acknowledged as his predecessors the European artists Frans Masereel and Otto Nückel. Released the week of the 1929 stock market crash, Gods’ Manwould continue to exert influence well beyond the Depression era, becoming an important source of inspiration for Beat Generation poet Allen Ginsberg.

Ward produced six wood engraving novels over the next eight years, including:

Ward left one more wordless novel partially completed at the time of his death in 1985. The 26 completed wood engravings (out of a planned total of 44) were published in a limited edition in 2001, under the title Lynd Ward’s Last, Unfinished, Wordless Novel.[15]

He also produced a wordless story for children, The Silver Pony, which is told entirely in black, white and shades of gray painted illustrations; it was published in 1973.

Other works

In 1930 Ward’s wood engravings were used to illustrate Alec Waugh‘s travel book Hot Countries; in 1936 an edition of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein was published with illustrations by Ward. His work on children’s books included his 1953 Caldecott Medal winning book The Biggest Bear, and his work on Esther ForbesJohnny Tremain.

Ward illustrated the 1942 children’s book The Little Red Lighthouse and the Great Gray Bridge, with text by Hildegarde Swift.

Ward’s work included an awareness of the racial injustice to be found in the United States. This is first apparent in the lynching scenes from Wild Pilgrimage and appears again in his drawings for North Star Shining: A Pictorial History of the American Negro, by Hildegarde Hoyt Swift, published in 1947. Ward uses African American characters, as well as several different Native ones in his book The Silver Pony.

In 1941 his illustrations were used in Great Ghost Stories of the World:The Haunted Omnibus, edited by Alexander Laing.

In 1974 Harry N. Abrams published Storyteller Without Words, a book that included Ward’s six novels plus an assortment of his illustrations from other books. Ward himself broke his silence and wrote brief prologues to each of his works. In 2010, the Library of America published Lynd Ward: Six Novels in Woodcuts, with a new chronology of Ward’s life and an introduction by Art Spiegelman.

Source: Wikipedia, You Tube and reading of the novels.