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3.2 Choosing Texts: Cornwall Knowns and Unknowns 3: Text and Image: Woman Lost 5.2.1 Lake Reflections 5.2.2 Tales from the Edge 5.3: Edgescapes 5: Presentation: Zemni 2021 In Process

Charcoal Drawing

I really like the dark moody tone of charcoal. In the past I have used a range of techniques. Using willow/vine, compressed and condensed charcoal on different types of paper. I do have to be careful though using charcoal as I have a lot of problems with the dust.

One way of overcoming this is to use pencil and then charcoal pencil.

Inspiration for improving technique

Pencil and charcoal pencil for hyperrealism

 

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3.1 Visual dynamics: Lost on the Way to Zennor 3.2 Choosing Texts: Cornwall Knowns and Unknowns 3: Text and Image: Woman Lost 5: Presentation: Zemni 2021 In Process

Procreate tips and tricks

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3.2 Choosing Texts: Cornwall Knowns and Unknowns 3: Text and Image: Woman Lost In Process

Anna Boghiguian

Anna Boghiguian was born in 1946, an Armenian in Cairo. Living a nomadic life, the artist has constantly moved between different cities across the globe, from Egypt to Canada and India to France. She studied political science at the American University in Cairo, Egypt, and Arts and Music at Concordia University in Montreal, Canada. The artist investigates subjects such as the history of the cotton trade, the salt trade and 

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3.2 Choosing Texts: Cornwall Knowns and Unknowns 3: Text and Image: Woman Lost Inspiration

Marjane Satrapi

Marjane Satrapi (Persian: مرجان ساتراپی‎) (born 22 November 1969) is an Iranian-born French graphic novelist, cartoonist, illustrator, film director, and children’s book author.

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3.2 Choosing Texts: Cornwall Knowns and Unknowns 3: Text and Image: Woman Lost In Process Inspiration

Michel Basquiat

forthcoming

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3.2 Choosing Texts: Cornwall Knowns and Unknowns 3: Text and Image: Woman Lost In Process Inspiration

Shaun Tan

Inspiration for:

Image and text

Sources

Shaun Tan website

Wikipedia

Shaun Tan is a graphic illustrator of very poignant short allegorical graphic novels whose work I very much admire. The strength is in the combination of very strong visual dynamics and simplification, coupled with a high level of artistic skill. His recent work uses maquettes and puppets.

Key works

http://www.shauntan.net/books.html

Shaun Tan is an Australian artist, writer and film maker. He won an Academy Award for The Lost Thing, a 2011 animated film adaptation of a 2000 picture book he wrote and illustrated. Beside The Lost Thing, The Red Tree and The Arrival are books he has written and illustrated. These have different but distinctive approaches to layout and combining image and text. Some of these have been animated – either straight animation of the illustrations with types text, or CGI.

His artistic process

Initially, Tan works in black and white because the final reproductions would be printed that way. Some black and white mediums he uses include pens, inks, acrylics, charcoal, scraperboard, photocopies, and linocuts.

Tan’s current colour works still begin in black and white. He uses a graphite pencil to make sketches on ordinary copy paper. The sketches are then reproduced numerous times with different versions varying with parts added or removed. Sometimes scissors are used for this purpose. The cut and paste collage idea in these early stages is often extend to the finished production with many of his illustrations using such materials as “glass, metal, cuttings from other books and dead insects”.

Tan describes himself as a slow worker who revises his work many times along the way. He is interested in loss and alienation, and believes that children in particular react well to issues of natural justice.

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3.2 Choosing Texts: Cornwall Knowns and Unknowns 3: Text and Image: Woman Lost In Process

Audrey Niffeneger

review of three incestuous sisters


review of three incestuous sisters
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Frans Masereel

Frans Masereel 1889 1972 Die Passion eines Menschen 1918 ChateauBoynetAgency 2012

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The City

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Google images

Frans Masereel (31 July 1889 – 3 January 1972) was a Flemish painter and graphic artist who worked mainly in France. He is known especially for his woodcuts. His greatest work is generally said to be the wordless novel Mon Livre d’Heures (Passionate Journey). He completed over 20 other wordless novels in his career. Masereel’s woodcuts strongly influenced the work of Lynd Ward and later graphic artists such as Clifford Harper and Eric Drooker. There is a Frans Masereel Centre (Frans Masereel Centrum for Graphix) in the village of Kasterlee in Belgium.

Frans Masereel was born in the Belgian Blankenberge on 31 July 1889. He moved to Ghent in 1896, where he began to study at the École des Beaux-Arts in the class of Jean Delvin at the age of 18. In 1909 he went on trips to England and Germany, which inspired him to create his first etchings and woodcuts. In 1911 Masereel settled in Paris for four years and then emigrated to Switzerland, where he worked as a graphic artist for journals and magazines. His woodcut series, mainly of sociocritical content and of expressionistic form concept, made Masereel internationally known. Among these were the wordless novels 25 Images of a Man’s Passion (1918), Passionate Journey (1919), The Sun (1919), The Idea (1920) and Story Without Words (1920). At that time Masereel also drew illustrations for famous works of world literature by Thomas Mann, Émile Zola and Stefan Zweig. In 1921 Masereel returned to Paris, where he painted his famous street scenes, the Montmartre paintings. He lived for a time in Berlin, where his closest creative friend was George Grosz. After 1925 he lived near Boulogne-sur-Mer, where he painted predominantly coast areas, harbour views, and portraits of sailors and fishermen. During the 1930s his output declined. In 1940 he fled from Paris and lived in several cities in Southern France.

At the end of World War II Masereel was able to resume his artistic work and produced woodcuts and paintings. After 1946 he worked for several years as a teacher at the Hochschule der Bildenden Künste Saar (de) in Saarbrücken. In 1949 Masereel settled in Nice. In the following years until 1968 several series of woodcuts were published, which differ from his earlier “novels in picture'” in comprising variations of a subject instead of being a continuing narrative. He also designed decorations and costumes for numerous theatre productions. The artist was honoured in numerous exhibitions and became a member of several academies. Frans Masereel died in Avignon in 1972 and was entombed in Ghent. The cultural organizationMasereelfonds was named after him.

Influence

From Mon Livre d’Heures (A Passionate Journey, 1919)

The American graphic artist Lynd Ward was greatly influenced by Masereel in creating his novels in woodcuts. A number of cartoonists have cited Masereel as an influence on the development of the graphic novel: Art Spiegelman cited Mon Livre d’Heures as an early influence on his Maus. Will Eisner cited Masereel as an influence on his work, as has scratchboard novelist Eric Drooker.

Wordless novels

Source: edited from Wikipedia articles on Masereel and his different works, the You Tube videos and reading of his graphic novels themselves.

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Feminism

“I have had to go to men as sources in my painting because the past has left us so small an inheritance of woman’s painting that had widened life….Before I put a brush to canvas I question, “Is this mine? Is it all intrinsically of myself? Is it influenced by some idea or some photograph of an idea which I have acquired from some man?”

Georgia O’Keefe
http://www.arthistoryarchive.com/arthistory/modern/Georgia-OKeeffe.html
For an interview with Georgia O’Keefe visit http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BYwKRVJaNEA

What is feminism?

Some people have found it helpful to think about the history of the feminist movement in terms of first, second and third waves. Broadly speaking, these are:

  • First wave – from the formation of the National Women’s Society for Women’s Suffrage in 1867 to full female enfranchisement in the UK in 1928.
  • Second wave – from the feminist movements associated with the American civil rights movement of the early 1960s to equality legislation in the UK in the 1970s.
  • Third wave – from the 1980s to the present day, more about social and political change than legislative change.

Feminist art and design

Guerrilla Girls
Hannah Höch (1889–1978)
Tamara de Lempicka (1898–1980)
Frida Kahlo (1907–54).
Martha Rosler
Visit the links below to discover more about feminism and feminist art:
http://www.ehow.com/facts_4910333_history-feminist-art-movement.html
http://www.arthistoryarchive.com/arthistory/feminist/Martha-Rosler.html

  • What were the social and political conditions that made these artists communicate in the ways they did?
  • How is this demonstrated in their work?
  • How did these artists establish their own artistic
    identity?

Feminist photography

Chapter 6 of your course reader (pp.292–96).

Inspiration