Shutterstock

Inspect all images at 100% resolution

1) For Commercial Stock: trademark issues (send as editorial)

  • no brand names
  • no IPP
  • keywords should not contain trademarks
  • no isolated pictures of single buildings and avoid landmark modern buildings

2) Noise

  • filmgrain
  • compression artefacts
  • posterisation
  • check skies and shadows

3) Composition/Concept

  • what is concept? what could it be used for?
  • arrangement not optimal. leading lines, rule of thirds. use in-camera grid
  • distracting elements
  • horizon line crooked
  • negative space so customers can insert text
  • shoot from different angles

4) Focus

  • Focus a bit too soft. try single and continuous focus
  • Camera shake: stabilise yourself against a tree, elbows in and don’t breathe
  • avoid zoom lens or move closer

5) Exposure

  • under or over-exposed – use histogram and correct
  • not good lighting
  • avoid midday, ‘golden hours’ 1 hour before or after sun

If rejected

  • look at on-line resources
  • use critique section on forums
  • sometimes they do make an error
  • make correction and re-submit

Stock Photography overview

Overview of different types of stock photography. Commercial vs Editorial images

Stock Photography outlets

  • Shutterstock: a good place to start because they give good support materials and useful technical feedback. On You Tube many contributors make most of their income from Shutterstock because of volume of sales
  • iStock Photo (part of Getty Images): photos, illustrations, video. Take 45% commission.
  • Pond5
  • Alamy
  • Dreamstime
  • Adobe Stock (took over Fotofolia)
  • Smugmug Pro can make good money. Make own website and pricing.
  • Foap: amateur phone Ap where you can sell direct from your phone
  • Clashot: sell photos through an Ap you set your own price 50-80$
  • Snapwire
  • EyeEm

Preparing for upload

Meta-data keywords

Copyright issues

What sells best

Addressing reasons for rejection

Very useful tips on resizing and resubmitting photographs.

Illustration

Brassai

The flâneur archetype takes different forms but can easily be identified in the figure of Brassaï (1899–1984) who embodies Rebecca Solnit’s description of the flâneur as “… the image of an observant and solitary man strolling about Paris” (Solnit, 2001, p.198). Brassaï photographed, in both senses, the darker side of Paris. He photographed transvestites and homosexuals at underground bars and clubs, and he photographed the streets of Paris extensively at night, published in the celebrated Paris by Night (1933).

Yang Yong Liang

Yang Yongliang is a Chinese contemporary artist. As a young student, he studied traditional Chinese painting and calligraphy before attending the Shanghai Art & Design Academy, where he specialized in decoration and design beginning in 1996. (Wikipedia)

He produces very atmospheric animated digital paintings that overlay traditional Chines landscapes with modern day scenes.

website: http://www.yangyongliang.com/Works.html 

This website has good coverage of his videos and other work.

Relevance to my practice:

Stylistic inspiration for  3.2 The Bamboocutter

I had hoped to animate some of my images from Aldeburgh using similar techniques. This is now postponed to VisCom Level 3.

Feminist landscape

Photography

Some early women photographers did do serious topographical work in the late nineteenth and early 20C:

  • Evelyn Cameron,
  • Laura Gilpin,
  • Frances Benjamin Johnson
  • Elizabeth Ellen Roberts

Artistic photography, continuing the ‘genteel’ occupations for lady sketchers and watercolourists, was also conducted by:

  • Anna Atkins
  • Julia Margaret Cameron
  • Lady Hawarden
  • Lady Elizabeth Eastlake

But their work  was more closely aligned with the family album, documentary and performance, rather topographic.  (ibid, p.188).
Feminist discourse since the 1970s has rejected the monopoly of the male gaze and articulated the female point of view in relation to the landscape. Social and technological developments have also made serious photographic excursions into the landscape considerably more accessible (Wells, 2011, p.189). A number of female photographers have, in one form or another, engaged with feminist politics in relation to the landscape and the concept of nature, as well as the male gaze.
For interesting feminist and other modern approaches  see:

  • Helen Sear’s series Grounded (2000), in which she digitally combines photographs of skies with images of animal hides photographed at a museum.
  • Jo Spence subverts classical depictions of nude female figures within idealised settings.
  • Elina Brotherus
  • Karen Knorr
  • Susan Trangmar
  • Sian Bonnell
  • Barbara Kruger
  • Joan Fontcuberta Bodyscapes (2005) employ three-dimensional imaging software used for military  applications to render landscape images of close-up photographs of his own body.

Women Photographers

List of women photographers by country

Portrait

Landscape

Some early women photographers did do serious topographical work in the late nineteenth and early 20C:

  • Evelyn Cameron,
  • Laura Gilpin,
  • Frances Benjamin Johnson
  • Elizabeth Ellen Roberts

Artistic photography, continuing the ‘genteel’ occupations for lady sketchers and watercolourists, was also conducted by:

  • Anna Atkins
  • Julia Margaret Cameron
  • Lady Hawarden
  • Lady Elizabeth Eastlake

But their work  was more closely aligned with the family album, documentary and performance, rather topographic.  (ibid, p.188).
Feminist discourse since the 1970s has rejected the monopoly of the male gaze and articulated the female point of view in relation to the landscape. Social and technological developments have also made serious photographic excursions into the landscape considerably more accessible (Wells, 2011, p.189). A number of female photographers have, in one form or another, engaged with feminist politics in relation to the landscape and the concept of nature, as well as the male gaze.
For interesting feminist and other modern approaches  see:

  • Helen Sear’s series Grounded (2000), in which she digitally combines photographs of skies with images of animal hides photographed at a museum.
  • Jo Spence subverts classical depictions of nude female figures within idealised settings.
  • Elina Brotherus
  • Karen Knorr
  • Susan Trangmar
  • Sian Bonnell
  • Barbara Kruger
  • Joan Fontcuberta Bodyscapes (2005) employ three-dimensional imaging software used for military  applications to render landscape images of close-up photographs of his own body.